Journal of HIV and Human Reproduction

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 8--12

The human immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with positive iron balance among subjects in Nnewi, South East Nigeria


Patrick O Manafa1, John C Aneke2, Chide E Okocha2, Stella-Maris C Okeke1, Nancy C Ibeh1, George O Chukwuma1, Ejike K Nwene3 
1 Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria
2 Department of Haematology, College of Health Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria
3 Clinical Services, Initiative for Good Health in , Enugu, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
John C Aneke
Department of Haematology, College of Health Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, PMB 5001, Nnewi, Anambra State
Nigeria

BACKGROUND: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with a number of metabolic derangements which have a remarkable impact on disease mortality and morbidity. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of HIV infection on iron status in apparently healthy seropositive adult subjects seen at a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of eighty subjects were recruited for the study which comprised of randomly selected forty HIV seropositive and seronegative individuals, respectively. Each participant had 5 ml of blood collected for serum ferritin, iron, total binding capacity (TIBC), and percentage saturation of transferrin estimation. Ferritin was determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique while iron and TIBC were measured by spectrophotometry; percentage transferrin saturation was calculated using the standard formula. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS (version 20), the Student's t-test was used for the comparison of means while the level of statistical significance was set at P< 0.05. RESULTS: The means of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were significantly higher (164.30 ± 138.52 ng/ml vs. 88.10 ± 57.75 ng/ml; P= 0.002 and 44.67 ± 12.95% vs. 32.42 ± 4.67%; P< 0.001, respectively) while the mean of serum TIBC was significantly lower (346.25 ± 81.83 μg/dl vs. 395.20 ± 66.70 μg/dl; P= 0.004, respectively) in test subjects compared with controls. Serum iron was not significantly different in the two populations of study subjects (P = 0.30). CONCLUSION: Infection with the HIV is associated with significant tissue iron loading; this could have important implications on disease course and morbidity.


How to cite this article:
Manafa PO, Aneke JC, Okocha CE, Okeke SMC, Ibeh NC, Chukwuma GO, Nwene EK. The human immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with positive iron balance among subjects in Nnewi, South East Nigeria.J HIV Hum Reprod 2016;4:8-12


How to cite this URL:
Manafa PO, Aneke JC, Okocha CE, Okeke SMC, Ibeh NC, Chukwuma GO, Nwene EK. The human immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with positive iron balance among subjects in Nnewi, South East Nigeria. J HIV Hum Reprod [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Jun 25 ];4:8-12
Available from: http://www.j-hhr.org/article.asp?issn=2321-9157;year=2016;volume=4;issue=1;spage=8;epage=12;aulast=Manafa;type=0